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Two killed and another injured in multiple train accidents

A Royal Railway train waits at the railway station in Phnom Penh in 2016. Two were killed and one injured in separate train accidents on Sunday. Athena Zeladonii
A Royal Railway train waits at the railway station in Phnom Penh in 2016. Two were killed and one injured in separate train accidents on Sunday. Athena Zeladonii Athena Zelandonii

Two killed and another injured in multiple train accidents

Two people were killed in a railroad accident in Takeo province on Sunday, with another injured in a separate accident in Preah Sihanouk the same day.

Cheal Phat, Tram Kak district traffic chief, said cousins Pang Pheakdey, 27, and Keo Run, 25, were riding a motorbike, and ducked under a safety barrier as a freight train was travelling through Takeo on its way from Phnom Penh to Sihanoukville. Both died on impact.

“They were hit and dragged for dozens of metres, so they died immediately at the scene. But this railway accident is not the mistake of the train operator. They rode the motorbike… under the checkpoint bar while the train was approaching at the intersection,” Phat said.

The bodies were returned to the families for a traditional funeral.

Later that day, Stung Hav district military official Seng Phoan was injured when a train hit his car from behind as he drove off-road along a railroad track

Chuob Nara, district traffic police chief, told The Post that Phoan was driving “carelessly”, but only had minor injuries.

John Guiry, CEO of Royal Railways, said Pheakdey and Run ducked under the barrier, broke the chain beneath it, ignored shouts and flashing lights, and ploughed straight into the train.

“The army guy thought he could beat the train. Well he didn’t,” Guiry added, saying the incident has been reported to appropriate officials.

Guiry said his company has daily inspections of equipment, and occasionally travels to communities living along the line to educate villagers about safety with pamphlets and videos.

Additional reporting by Andrew Nachemson

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