Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - The Vietnamese view

The Vietnamese view

The Vietnamese view

Editor's note: The Post takes the pulse ahead of the July 27 election.

We asked ethnic Vietnamese residents, a popular target for many parties, for their

views on the campaign so far.

"I only want to live in happiness, thinking only about my business. I don't

know who will win the election, so I'm just waiting. I voted in 1998."-Nav,

26, cake vendor.

"If Hun Sen wins, my living will be easy. If not, I will go back to Vietnam.

Unlike previous leaders, Hun Sen has constructed roads and helped poor people. I

see his activities on TV. I've heard people say that the Vietnamese took Cambodian

land, but that is the business of the governments and their leaders. It is not my

business."-Hoa, 32, construction worker.

"I'm neutral. All I want is to run a simple business. I was born in Cambodia.

I have a voting card and I am going to vote in this election. I voted in 1993 and

1998 and I went through the Pol Pot regime. Those who liberated me from Pol Pot?

Well, I will help them in return."-Bunheng, 50, construction worker.

"I was born in Koh Thom, Kandal province and have voted twice. I don't know

who will win, but the government is doing well and I don't want to change the leader.

I haven't felt afraid during the election campaign."-Bear, 33, housewife.

"I don't care who says what during the campaign. I wil vote for any party that

helps the people, but only the CPP can lead the government as it has the experience.

Nothing will happen after the election. The Vietnamese government hasn't violated

Cambodian land since before Sam Rainsy was even born."-Dak, 29, unemployed.

"The SRP is not good. I live peacefully now and don't want anything to change.

The CPP will win."-Deung, 24, car-repairer.

"I don't think anything bad will happen on or after election day. I earn a simple

living fairly well under today's government. The opposition party is saying bad things

about Vietnamese, so I don't like the SRP at all. They should not even be in the

election."-Dak, 48, car wheel adjuster.

"I'm concerned about the quarrels between the parties. My business is very small,

so it's hard for me when there is conflict. I need peace to earn my living and have

security in my life. I have never met Sam Rainsy but I don't think he's any good,

especially to Vietnamese."-Sok Teung, 30, car-repairer.

"I am going to vote this year but I don't want to talk about the SRP raising

the Vietnamese immigrant issue in order to get more votes."-Ly, 20, vendor.

"The situation is not so good. The CPP and Funcinpec are always opposing each

other and I'm worried there will be armed conflict after the election."-Ling,

21, scavenger.

"I am going to vote to choose a good leader. The election campaign is good,

as long as it is without violence. I do not discriminate against races. Sam Rainsy

is also good. The immigration issue is up to the leaders. Racial discrimination should

not be important. We all want a better life."-San An, 30, mechanic.

MOST VIEWED

  • ‘Education’ a priority traffic-law penalty

    A top National Police official on June 21 neither rejected nor confirmed the authenticity of a leaked audio message, which has gone viral on social media, on a waiver of fines for a number of road traffic-related offences. General Him Yan, deputy National Police chief in

  • Pursat Ford assembly plant opens

    The Kingdom’s first Ford assembly plant was inaugurated on June 16 in Pursat province amid rising demand for brand-new vehicles among Cambodians. The facility is seen as a game changer for the domestic automobile industry, which could bring a wave of investors seeking to cash

  • Siem Reap’s $18M zoo said to educate public, help wildlife

    Angkor Wildlife and Aquarium Co Ltd has invested $18 million in a zoo in Siem Reap province, which will be opened in October to educate and promote animal conservation as well as attract national and international tourists. Currently, the Angkor Wildlife and Aquarium is building the

  • Angkor photo rules clarified

    The Apsara National Authority (ANA) denied that it had banned the use of camera tripods in the Angkor Archaeological Park, explaining that the confusion stemmed from a long-standing rule which required commercial photographers and videographers to apply for permission to film. The explanation followed a

  • $50B infrastructure plan en route

    The government’s upcoming $50 billion,10-year infrastructure master plan will provide tremendous investment opportunities for domestic and foreign entities, transport experts and economists say. Minister of Public Works and Transport Sun Chanthol revealed the plan to Japanese ambassador to Cambodia Masahiro Mikami on June 15. At

  • Nestle’s debut may spur dairy market

    Leading confectionery manufacturer Nestle plans to invest in Cambodia by setting up an operation in the near future, a move majorly hailed by local dairy farmers as a means of boosting the fresh milk market in the Kingdom. During a visit by a delegation led