Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Woman’s death prompts scrutiny of unlicensed clinic

Woman’s death prompts scrutiny of unlicensed clinic

Woman’s death prompts scrutiny of unlicensed clinic

The Ministry of Health is warning patients to avoid unlicensed health clinics after a woman who was treated at an illegal facility in Siem Reap died earlier this week.

The provincial health department said yesterday that while it believes the woman’s death was caused by Guillain-Barré syndrome – a rare and untreatable nerve disorder – and not by the facility’s treatment, it will still take action against the clinic for operating illegally.

“We, the Siem Reap Provincial Health Department, will continue to work on this issue as we do not allow anyone to run a private clinic without a legal licence,” said Kros Sarath, director of the department.

At the beginning of this month, the victim, 23, sought medical advice for an itch on her head from Dr Hong Meng Thai at a clinic of the same name in Siem Reap’s Bakong district, her family told the Post yesterday. She was given no diagnosis but received two injections and oral medication, according to her sister.

“I didn’t bring her to hospital because … I thought it was not a serious illness,” her father said.

But shortly after the clinic visit, the patient began experiencing numbness in her hands and then her legs. After three days, she returned to the doctor, who said he was too busy to see her, the patient’s family said.

Suffering from rapidly decreasing mobility, the patient went to the Siem Reap provincial hospital one day later and was told to seek emergency medical assistance in Phnom Penh. The family took her to Calmette Hospital, where “the doctor told us that 70 per cent of her body was dead already and that maybe it was because of … using the wrong medicine”, her father said.

The Calmette doctors told the family there was nothing more they could do, and so the family took their daughter home, where she died on Monday.

The family lodged a complaint about the clinic with district police, who discovered that the clinic, which had just opened this month, was not licensed.

When the Post called the clinic, the man who answered said he was not a doctor and not aware of a Dr Meng Thai.

ADDITIONAL REPORTING BY LAIGNEE BARRON

MOST VIEWED

  • Hun Sen’s China visit ‘a good opportunity’

    Prime Minister Hun Sen’s visit to Beijing on Sunday to discuss economic and trade issues presents a good opportunity for the Kingdom to strengthen Chinese ties and counter punitive measures by the West, an analyst says. The prime minister’s four-day official visit to

  • Former chief bodyguard receives royal pardon

    The former chief bodyguard of late Senate president Chea Sim has received a royal pardon nearly eight years after he was sentenced to 15 years behind bars on several charges, according to a royal decree dated November 12, last year, and obtained by The Post on Wednesday.

  • Close to the edge: Hair raising pictures from Kulen Mountain

    A new hair raising attraction on Kulen Mountain has finally opened to the public, with people flocking to the protruding cliff edge overlooking green mountainous forests to take photographs. The giant overhanging rock is situated in an area known as Mahendraparvata – an ancient city of

  • US warned not to interfere despite successful meeting

    A senior Ministry of National Defence official said the Tuesday meeting between the US Deputy Assistant Secretary of Defence for South and Southeast Asia Joseph H Felter and General Neang Phat had helped strengthen relations between the two countries’ militaries. However, a senior Cambodian People’