Logo of Phnom Penh Post newspaper Phnom Penh Post - Ghost hotels linger amidst Siem Reap’s tourist boom



Ghost hotels linger amidst Siem Reap’s tourist boom

Content image - Phnom Penh Post

Ghost hotels linger amidst Siem Reap’s tourist boom

For the past two decades, Siem Reap has enjoyed a steady increase in tourists, which has largely driven the famed templed city’s recent construction sector growth.

Consisting mostly of hotels, guesthouses and restaurants, these commercial spaces catering to tourists are concentrated just about seven kilometres to the south of Angkor Wat.

Amid the growing construction race, however, there remain two hotels of considerable size – along the prime area of National Road 6 – that have yet to be completed, having remained stagnant for more than ten years.

Of the two abandoned hotel projects on National Road 6, the first one lies on a land plot bigger than one hectare on the east of Siem Reap’s riverbank, opposite the Borei Angkor Hotel nearby the Thom Thmei Market. The second project, meanwhile, sits on a two-hectare land plot between Siem Reap’s city centre and its national airport.

Chea Savy, a Siem Reap resident, said, “From what I remember, the hotel-like project on National Road 6 around Phsar Ler started construction in 2007, but it is now 2016 and there has been no progress on its construction.”

Ho Vandy, an advisor to Cambodia’s Chamber of Commerce and former head of a tourism company said, “These two unfinished hotels have potential in this tourist area. They should’ve been finished and opened, but we don’t know how deep the problems are as well as the internal issues between the two investors.”

He added that there are now around 20 to 30 three to five-star hotels being renovated in Siem Reap.

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
The one-hectare hotel is 10 years in the making. Moeun Nhean

“Recently, the hotel sector is becoming increasingly competitive and all the hotels are upgrading their amenities and luxuriousness,” Vandy said.

“Some hotel owners need to renovate their properties to stay updated with the world’s demands on the tourism sector,” he added.

Kim Chhay Heang, Siem Reap’s deputy provincial governor, confirmed that the two unfinished hotels have been there for almost one and two decades respectivley, and have been seemingly abandoned for years.

It is understood that one of the hotels was to be named ‘Monoreach Hotel’, but Chhay Heang was unsure if the proposed development was supposed to be a hotel or hospital.

“It is hard for us to get information on these companies’ issues,” he said.

“Any developer who wants to open a hotel, guesthouse, or restaurant needs to request for a legal permit or business license from the Ministry of Tourism.”

“Our provincial authorities can only give the investors the letter of permit so that they can start running a business on those permitted locations,” Chhay Heang noted.

A vendor in Siem Reap, who wished to remain anonymous, claimed that the land of one of the developments belongs to a high-ranking official working in the Ministry of Interior.

Content image - Phnom Penh Post
Sprawled across two hectares of prime land along National Road 6, this development remains abandoned despite construction starting 20 years ago. Moeun Nhean

According to Chhay Heang, Siem Reap now has around 200 hotels totalling approximately 20,000 rooms. This figure does not include some 300 other tourist accommodations like guesthouses and boutique hotels.

“The number of tourists to Siem Reap will continue to increase annually at about 12 per cent, and so the number of accommodation has to correspond to this amount,” he said.

Sou Platong, governor for Siem Reap City, admitted that there are grand – but unfinished – projects in the city. Claiming that the incomplete developments are too big for City Hall to handle, Platong said that “we do not plan to intervene with the investors.”

“The City Hall here reserves all the rights to manage every construction project ranging from one to 500 square metres only,” he said.

“Anything bigger than that will be handled by the provincial authorities, and the biggest ones will fall into the hands of the Apsara authority,” Platong said.

The authority did not respond to questions before deadline.

MOST VIEWED

  • Hong Kong firm done buying Coke Cambodia

    Swire Coca-Cola Ltd, a wholly-owned subsidiary of Hong Kong-listed Swire Pacific Ltd, on November 25 announced that it had completed the acquisition of The Coca-Cola Co’s bottling business in Cambodia, as part of its ambitions to expand into the Southeast Asian market. Swire Coca-Cola affirmed

  • Cambodia's Bokator now officially in World Heritage List

    UNESCO has officially inscribed Cambodia’s “Kun Lbokator”, commonly known as Bokator, on the World Heritage List, according to Minister of Culture and Fine Arts Phoeurng Sackona in her brief report to Prime Minister Hun Sen on the night of November 29. Her report, which was

  • NagaWorld union leader arrested at airport after Australia trip

    Chhim Sithar, head of the Labour Rights Supported Union of Khmer Employees at NagaWorld integrated casino resort, was arrested on November 26 at Phnom Penh International Airport and placed in pre-trial detention after returning from a 12-day trip to Australia. Phnom Penh Municipal Court Investigating Judge

  • Sub-Decree approves $30M for mine clearance

    The Cambodian government established the ‘Mine-Free Cambodia 2025 Foundation’, and released an initial budget of $30 million. Based on the progress of the foundation in 2023, 2024 and 2025, more funds will be added from the national budget and other sources. In a sub-decree signed by Prime Minister Hun Sen

  • Two senior GDP officials defect to CPP

    Two senior officials of the Grassroots Democratic Party (GDP) have asked to join the Cambodian People’s Party (CPP), after apparently failing to forge a political alliance in the run-up to the 2023 general election. Yang Saing Koma, chairman of the GDP board, and Lek Sothear,

  • Cambodia's poverty cut in half from 2009 to 2019: World Bank report

    A report published by the World Bank on November 28 states that Cambodia’s national poverty rate fell by almost half between 2009 and 2019, but the Covid-19 pandemic recently reversed some of the poverty reduction progress. Cambodia’s poverty rate dropped from 33.8 to 17.8 per cent over the 10