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Aspiring coaches going through IAAF course

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Aspiring coaches going through IAAF course

With coaching education becoming vitally important and competence-based, the Khmer Athletics Federation (KAF) has embraced the support of the IAAF’s newly introduced Level I Coaches Education and Certification System (CECS) course, taking advantage of the World Governing body’s offer of this service to member nations.

As many as 24 participants drawn from nine provinces have already completed their first week of lessons and practicals as part of the 12-day course, which ends on Thursday at Olympic Stadium.

The course began at the Kingdom’s national stadium under the supervision of IAAF named instructors Rafiq Ahmed of Pakistan and Bo Puth Reatrey of Cambodia, with KAF President Bun Sok also playing an active role.

The main objectives of this basic course are to produce qualified youth coaches who will be able to train and prepare teenagers, and to build a bridge between kid’s-level running, jumping and throwing to the real world of athletics.

The Level 1 syllabus covers all event groups and places importance on the practical skills of coaching. The trainees have been going through several outdoor activities related to the trade skills of coaching and monitoring

‘It is heartening’
It also provides a theoretical base which allows coaches to continue learning either on their own or within the CECS scope, according to KAF secretary-general Pen Vuthy.

While IAAF accredited experts and standardised course materials are regular norms, the structure and timetable have been kept flexible to suit local conditions and needs.

“In regional athletics, Cambodia has long struggled to raise its performance standards,” NOCC Secretary-General Vath Chamroeun said.

“It is heartening to note that the athletics federation has taken this important step to encourage youngsters to pick up vital coaching skills and help the sport grow.”

While many of the Cambodian long-distance runners have made a mark in the local half-marathon circuit, in higher level competitions like the SEA Games they have almost always been towards the back.

The KAF is confident that this Level 1 course will inspire the participants to keep going and get to the next levels and help build up reserves as it embarks on one of the greatest sports spectacles the Kingdom has ever hosted – the 2023 SEA Games.

The CECS is operated at three levels in seven languages – English, French, Spanish, Arabic, Chinese, Russian and Portugese – and its financial resources are drawn from Olympic Solidarity and other partners at both international and national levels.

The course concludes on Thursday, which features the certification of those who pass muster and step up to the next level.

The closing ceremony has been scheduled for 5pm at Olympic Stadium.


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