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Nuon Soriya triumphs at TV3

Nuon Soriya triumphs at TV3

Nuon Soriya and Thun Sophea cruise past foreign rivals Saturday at TV3 boxing arena

Nuon Soriya punched his way past Australian James Polodna on Saturday, scoring a one-sided decision victory at the TV3 boxing arena.

Nuon Soriya drove Polodna backward with three- and four-punch combinations and punished the Australian’s legs with low kicks throughout the later rounds.

“That looked really bad, didn’t it,” Polodna said afterward.

Polodna, 25, started quickly, snapping off two hard high kicks within seconds of the opening bell. The crack from the first shot pierced the din of the packed arena.

“He kicks hard,” said Nuon Soriya, sitting on his stool after the round, with an approving smile.

Polodna, who said he started boxing at age 6, struggled to land much after the opening round, however.

By the second, Nuon Soriya, 30, appeared to have Polodna figured out, and he easily avoided the Australian’s high kicks.

By the third, Nuon Soriya was countering aggressively.

“I usually go low [kick] and then head kick,” Polodna said. “But he was clicking onto it and chopping me when I missed.”

Polodna began to slow in the fourth, and he fought the final two rounds mostly with defense.

“I had no power,” said Polodna, who dropped 7 kilograms over the last week in order to make weight for the fight. “But no excuses, he is a really good fighter.”

As Polodna faded, Nuon Soriya picked up the pace, scoring with combinations and low kicks, and he came out with a flurry in the final round, driving Polodna backward across the ring with punches and landing knees and elbows.

“The fifth round was bad,” Polodna said. “I was taking a beating.”

Later Saturday, Thun Sophea outpointed French fighter Adil Khodja in the second international match at TV3.

Khodja, 23, only recently turned professional, boasting a record of 9-1. He was the French semiprofessional champion from 2007-2009.

At semipro and amateur levels, fighters wear protective gear and rounds and rest periods are shorter.

On Saturday, Khodja was the busier fighter in the first two rounds, as Thun Sophea waited patiently and scored with low kicks.

Neither fighter appeared eager to brawl, and referee Meas Sokry prompted them to “box” on several occasions. Khodja’s cornerman screamed “Attack! Attack!”

In brief exchanges, Thun Sophea methodically chopped away at Khodja’s legs with low kicks. After five rounds, Khodja’s thighs were bruised, red and welted both inside and out.

“No good,” Khodja said.

TV3 hosts international bouts every other weekend. Chey Kosal and Lao Sinath are scheduled to appear April 3.

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